Woodlands.co.uk

SOLD: Wulfbert Wood £75,000 Leasehold

Description

Wulfbert Wood is made up of mature Corsican and Scots pine, of around 60 years old, with other broadleaved tree species too, particularly around the edges. Most of the wood has a high pine canopy with sycamore, rowan, elder, hawthorn, hazel and holly bushes growing beneath. Along the southern boundary, bordering a drain, there are largely deciduous trees such as coppiced alder, birch and sycamore. At the field edge, there’s some much older boundary trees such as a spreading sycamore (ideal for a tree house or look out post?), oaks and a very large ash tree.

At ground level, throughout the wood, there is a carpet of bluebells and stitchwort as well as an abundance of soft shield fern and lady fern. Here and there are patches of blackberry and wild raspberry bushes too, the fruits of which are popular with the resident wildlife.

Wulfbert Wood is part of a connecting green corridor of woodlands and hedgerows, stretching from Strensall to Buttercrambe and is therefore rich in wildlife.

Woodland birds are ever-present but very obvious in the spring and early summer. Coal tit, blackcap, chiff chaff, blackbird and wren are common and large groups of different tit species move through the wood in ‘nursery’ flocks, feeding on insects in the canopy. Spotted flycatchers may also be seen in the summer months. Often, buzzards can be seen and heard, hunting on the field margins.

Woodland mammals also pass through, evident from their tracks through the undergrowth. It would be fascinating to put out a trail camera to record what visits, but expect to see roe deer, foxes, badger, stoats and hare to name but a few.

Drains form the boundaries of the wood to the south and on the east and north eastern edges. On the field boundary there is also a ditch along much of the line. These carry water after wet weather but do dry up in warmer spells. As the wood is on sandy soils (Sand Hutton is named after this), it is quite well drained.

The outlook across the fields to the west is rather lovely, particularly in evening sunshine. A bench is situated close to this edge, near the huge ash tree and an upturned stump.

The ride-stop entrance to Wulfbert Wood is situated at the end of a track and is used as the turning head for vehicles within the wood as a whole.

A strimmed path leads off directly from the ride-stop heading north-west, weaving through the ferns and round a grove of elder bushes to the field boundary where the bench is found. This then continues on and towards the south western end, loops back to the southern path, creating a circular route.

The southern path runs parallel with the southern boundary, leading directly on from the main track. This isn’t a right of way but does occasional get used by locals.

The woods are held on a 999 year lease dating from 25th September 1952

The sporting rights are reserved to the lessors. The lessees may shoot deer, wood pigeons, squirrels and any vermin.

Wulfbert Wood has a ready supply of timber for firewood or other uses and would make a great base, surrounded by nature, for crafters and conservationists.

Sand Hutton village is mentioned in the Domesday Book as Hottune. After the Norman invasion, the manor was shared between Sprot and Gospatric, son of Arnketil. Subsequently, it was split between the Crown and Hugh, son Baldric who installed Wulfbert of Hutton as lord of the manor, after whom the wood takes its name. On old maps, the wood has also been known as ‘Great Wood’.

Sand Hutton is derived from the Old English words hoh and -tun meaning a hill or spur of projecting land and settlement. The prefix Sand was added later to denote the type of soil in the area and distinguish it from other Huttons in the area.

The purchasers of the woodland will be asked to enter into a covenant to ensure the quiet and peaceful enjoyment of adjoining woodlands and meadows.

Trees

Wulfbert Wood is made up of mature Corsican pine and Scots pine, of around 60 years old, with other broadleaved tree species too, particularly around the edges. Most of the wood has a high pine canopy with sycamore, rowan, elder, hawthorn, hazel and holly bushes growing beneath. Along the southern boundary, bordering a drain, there are largely deciduous trees such as coppiced alder, birch and sycamore. At the field edge, there’s some much older boundary trees such as a spreading sycamore (ideal for a tree house or look out post?) oaks and a very large ash tree.

At ground level, throughout the wood, there is a carpet of bluebells, stitchwort as well as an abundance of soft shield fern and lady fern. Here and there are patches of blackberry and wild raspberry bushes too, the fruits of which are popular with the resident wildlife.

Wildlife

Wulfbert Wood is part of a connecting green corridor of woodlands and hedgerows, stretching from Strensall to Buttercrambe and therefore is rich in wildlife.

Woodland birds are ever-present but very obvious in the spring and early summer. Coal tit, blackcap, chiff chaff, blackbird and wren are common and large groups of different tit species move through the wood in ‘nursery’ flocks, feeding on insects in the canopy. Spotted flycatchers may also be seen in the summer months. Often, buzzards can be seen and heard, hunting on the field margins.

Woodland mammals also pass through, evident from their tracks through the undergrowth. It would be fascinating to put out a trail camera to see what visits but expect roe deer, foxes, badger, stoats and hare.

Features

Drains form the boundaries of the wood to the south and on the east and north eastern edges. On the field boundary there is also a ditch along much of the line. These carry water after wet weather but do dry up in warmer spells. As the wood is on sandy soils (Sand Hutton is named after this), it is quite well drained.

The outlook across the fields to the west is rather lovely, particularly in evening sunshine. A bench is situated close to this edge, near the huge ash tree and an upturned stump.

Access, tracks and footpaths

The ride-stop entrance to Wulfbert Wood is situated at the end of a track and is used as the turning head for vehicles within the wood as a whole.

A strimmed path leads off directly from the ride-stop heading north-west, weaving through the ferns and round a grove of elder bushes to the field boundary where the bench is found. This then continues on and towards the south western end, loops back to the southern path, creating a circular route.

The southern path runs parallel with the southern boundary, leading directly on from the main track. This isn’t a right of way but does occasional get used by locals.

Rights and covenants

The woods are held on a 999 year lease dating from 25th September 1952

The sporting rights are reserved to the lessors. The lessees may shoot deer, wood pigeons, squirrels and any vermin.

Activities

Wulfbert Wood has a ready supply of timber for firewood or other uses and would make a great base, surrounded by nature, for crafters and conservationists.

Local area and history

Sand Hutton village is mentioned in the Domesday Book as Hottune. After the Norman invasion, the manor was shared between Sprot and Gospatric, son of Arnketil. Subsequently, it was split between the Crown and Hugh son Baldric who installed Wulfbert of Hutton as lord of the manor, after whom the wood takes its name. On old maps, the wood has also been known as ‘Great Wood’.

Sand Hutton is derived from the Old English words hoh and -tun meaning a hill or spur of projecting land and settlement. The prefix Sand was added later to denote the type of soil in the area and distinguish it from other Huttons in the area.

Wood maps

Wood map

Boundaries

The boundaries of Wulfbert Wood are mostly formed by drains. There are blue markings on post tops and trees.

Find this wood

This wood is now sold, please do not visit the wood without the permission of the owner.

Location

  • OS Landranger: OS No. 105
  • Grid ref: SE 697 575
  • Nearest post code: YO41 1LJ
  • GPS coordinates: 54.0092, -0.936682

Location map

Directions

  • Directions from York by car:
  • Follow the A64 around York.
  • At the roundabout with the A1237 and the A64 continue on the A64 signed to Malton and Scarborough.
  • After 3 miles turn right signed to Sand Hutton.
  • Continue through Sand Hutton and at the end of the village turn right on to Stamford Bridge Road signed to Stamford Bridge.
  • The wood is ½ mile along this road and to the right.
  • Park close to the Woodlands for Sale sign, please do not block the entrance gate.
  • Wulfbert Wood is 450 metres along the woodland track, situated at the end of the track.

How we support our buyers

Membership of the small woodland owners’ group

£300 for a woodland course of your choice

Free copies of two woodland books

One year's free membership of the royal forestry society

Please note this wood is owned by woodlands.co.uk.

Our regional managers are often out working in our woodlands, so if you email an offer and want to be sure it has been received, please phone our manager on their mobile phone. The first offer at the stated price which is accepted, whether by phone or email, has priority.

Please take care when viewing as the great outdoors can contain unexpected hazards and woodlands are no exception. You should exercise common sense and caution, such as wearing appropriate footwear and avoiding visiting during high winds.

These particulars are for guidance only and, though believed to be correct, do not form part of any contract. Woodland Investment Management Ltd hereby give notice under section 21 of the Estate Agents Act 1979 of their interest in the land being sold.

Scots and Corsican pine woodland with a carpet of bluebells and ferns. Great for wildlife and close to York.

Managed by Dan Watson

Telephone: 07970 116 515

Email: [email protected]