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Turbo Saw Mill – making an oak gate post

by mikepepler ~ 17 January, 2015 ~ 7 comments

Richard Hare and Mike Pepler are using a Turbo saw mill to create an oak gatepost for use in a woodland.  Although this cutting is being done indoors it could be done in a woodland where the oak tree was felled

Woodchip Boiler

by WoodlandsTV ~ 11 March, 2014 ~ one comment

Here Clive Jones tells us about the processes of the chip wood fired boiler system his family use with great success on their land at Moonfleet Farm in Dorset. Clive explains how they manage their coppiced woodland and how the efficient wood chip boiler system supplies the heating and hot water for the farm house and cottage using waste wood fuel, hedge cuttings and prunings from the farm.
http://www.moonfleetfarm.com
An Adliberate film http://www.adliberate.co.uk for WoodlandsTV http://www.woodlands.co.uk/tv

Collecting Tools

by WoodlandsTV ~ 25 October, 2013 ~ 5 comments

Jane Rees, an avid collector of traditional tools, shows us her impressive hoard displayed on her stand at `Treefest` at the Forestry Commission`s Arboretum at Westonbirt. Jane tells us about those tools specific to woodlands, including a vast number of saw sets. Sharing the personal stories behind her collection, Jane shows us her writings on the subject and expertly explains the specific uses of a range of tools.
www.taths.org.uk
www.reestools.co.uk
www.woodlands.co.uk/tv
www.forestry.gov.uk/westonbirt
www.adliberate.co.uk

Steam Saw

by WoodlandsTV ~ 11 October, 2013 ~ 2 comments

Peter Brown takes his agricultural saw - driven by steam engine - a showman`s living van and water bowser to work at Westonbirt`s `Treefest`, picking up water from brooks and streams as they go. Here he tells us how the business has run in his family for generations - from his grandfather, to his father and now to Peter and his son. The 1920 steam saw cuts timber via a system of levers and pulley wheels, all powered by the 1897 engine.
www.timber-yard.co.uk
www.woodlands.co.uk/tv
www.forestry.gov.uk/westonbirt
www.adliberate.co.uk

Chainsaw Carving

by WoodlandsTV ~ 4 October, 2013 ~ 4 comments

Join Anne Watson, David Lucas and Patrick Brown as they demonstrate and discuss their passion for chainsaw carving at `Treefest` at Westonbirt Arboretum. Anne`s father had a timber business and she grew up surrounded by the tools; David developed his interest having seen a chainsaw carving show and Patrick, with a background in forestry, is a self-taught sculptor. Here they explain the difficulties and delights of producing certain designs as well as the dangers and important safeguards behind the process.
www.woodlandcentre.co.uk
www.lucascarvings.co.uk
www.patrick-brown.co.uk
www.woodlands.co.uk/tv
www.forestry.gov.uk/westonbirt
www.adliberate.co.uk

Competition Axe and Saw

by WoodlandsTV ~ 27 September, 2013 ~ 2 comments

An enthusiastic team of Welsh chainsaw and axe-handlers demonstrates skill, strength and speed at Westonbirt`s `Treefest`. They explain the different methods of chopping wood, show the speed of a modified chainsaw engine against a more common version and impress the crowds with their axe-wielding knowledge and expertise.
www.welshaxemen.co.uk
www.woodlands.co.uk/tv
www.forestry.gov.uk/westonbirt
www.adliberate.co.uk

Archery, powerful bows and arrows

by WoodlandsTV ~ 17 January, 2011 ~ 110 comments

http://www.woodlands.co.uk Woodlands archery, powerful bows and arrows. Long bows made from yew were used during the Hundred Years War. Neil Eddiford from Wolfshead Bowmen describes the properties that made yew suitable for the long bow, and how often English yew wasn't used at all. Other woods used for bows were ash and wych elm. He also looks at the arrows with fletchlings of goose feather, a bodkin point or a needle bodkin. These are serious weapons for medieval warfare, and Neil describes the range and penetration power these arrows could have.

Wolfshead Bowmen are a re-enactment group and Woodlands TV met up with them at the Weald Wood Fair at Bentley Wildfowl and Motor Museum.

Using an adze

by WoodlandsTV ~ 2 December, 2010 ~ 7 comments

http://www.woodlands.co.uk/ Kim Williams is using an adze. She is dubbing or adzing some timber planks using an adze, for a reconstruction Anglo Saxon building. Kim is part of the East Sussex Archaeology and Museums Partnership ESAMP . Using the adze Kim shaves slivers of wood from the planks. This ensures there are no traces of 21st century tools on what will eventually be part of a recreated Anglo Saxon building. This demonstration took place at the Weald WoodFair 2010, which is an annual event set at the Bentley Wildfowl and Motor Museum. WoodlandsTV have made three visits there, and Woodlands.co.uk always have an exhibition stand.

Stone Age bows and woodland archaeology

by WoodlandsTV ~ 22 November, 2010 ~ 12 comments

Remains of bows found from the Stone Age suggest our ancestors were taller and stronger than we think - with Allan Course.

Flint Knapping -how to be a flint knapper

by WoodlandsTV ~ 13 November, 2010 ~ 31 comments

http://www.woodlands.co.uk Flint Knapping. How to be a flint knapper. What is flint knapping. Allan Course demonstrates how a neolithic arrowhead was made. This is the art of flint knapping and the tools he uses come from the antlers of a red deer. The piece of flint is hit by direct percussion - in other words Allan hits the antler bone on top of the flint to get a flake of flint from the side to produce the arrowhead. Flint knapping takes a lot of practice but once you are skilled at it you can get repeatable good results.
The flake of flint is then shaped to produce in this case a leaf shaped arrowhead. This style of arrowhead was in use in Britain between 4000BC to 1500 BC.
The tools for this part are also very simple - a piece of leather to protect the hand, and another small piece of antler bone. By putting the piece of antler on the edge of the flint and pushing down tiny pieces of flint are chippped off. The tip of the arrowhead has to be very sharp to penetrate flesh effectively. Having worked on the tip , the sides are then trimmed to be sharp and reasonably straight.

The process takes about 3 minutes and tells us something about our ancestors in prehistory. We can be pretty sure they had specialist flint knappers, so an expert could turn out about 20 arrowheads in an hour . Although the process was quick it required a high degree of skill to be so productive which is why they specialised. The rest of the arrow is the other way around. It doesn't take much skill to take a piece of hazel wood, take the bark off, smooth it and add feathers to it, but it does take a lot of time. So archaeologists will look at these crafts in two ways. The flint arrowhead is high skill, low labour, whereas the reat of the arrow is relatively low skill, and high labour. In Britain in say 3000BC there would have been no need for everybody to become an expert flint knapper because the amount of time they would have to spend on it to become good, compared to the time that they actually needed to use that skill just doesn't make it an efficient process. So we're certain flint knappers were specialists. We're also pretty sure that one flint knapper on a part time basis, because he had his own farm and livestock to look after, could have serviced a community of two hundred people. so flint knappers were specialists.
http://www.woodlands.co.uk

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