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Future Forest: The Sylva Foundation ~ by WoodlandsTV

By woodlandstv

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The Sylva foundation is an environmental charity that works across England focussing on science, education, forestry and wood. Here Gabriel Hemery shows us around the foundations exciting project Future Forest.

This future forest is created by the people, as donors and friends of the forest chose their plot and their trees within it resulting in a fascinating mix of species. Learn more about all the Sylva Foundation does by visiting their website. https://sylva.org.uk/forestfriend

With many thanks to The Sylva Foundation and Gabriel Hemery

A Sava Films film
www.savafilms.com

Posted in: Uncategorised ~ On: 30 November, 2018

6 comments so far

Em McCord
November 30, 2018

I wish every country had a program like this. People do not understand how important trees are. They give us oxygen, provide for all types of wildlife, and many contain medicine. They are not just for wood and to make our houses "pretty". Without trees we would not be here. I am so glad there is a foundation like the Sylva foundation. Thank you for posting this video !

Whipple 1
November 30, 2018

. I applaud your vision and understand that you are concerned for the health of your forests. My statement of caution to you would be to extensively and infinitesimally scrutinize the species that you are planting, especially the varieties that are not native to your region. There is a reason why they don't exist there now. Many plants that have been placed in gardens with good intention can become invasive species and ruin the plant culture in your area if they can grow unchecked.

As a farm property caretaker in Pennsylvania, I am personally engaged in a fight with a half dozen species of grasses, shrubby plants and trees that were originally and innocently placed in private and public gardens as specimen plants and trees. They escaped into the wild by animal vectors and by natural means like wind and water. They are now, at the very least a nuisance, and by many accounts, economically detrimental to the forest. They have no natural enemies outside of their native habitats and the control methods we are forced to employ include mechanical, chemical and biological agents. All of which are expensive in terms of money and time and also have consequences, some of which our best scientists and biologists have yet to fully comprehend.

Thoughtful and planful steps need to be taken to ensure that the biodiversity we wish for future generations does not become a nightmare that we hand off to them to inherit.

Cheers!

Whipple

Mr. White
November 30, 2018

It'll all be bulldozed to build housing for migrants.

Al Mollitor
November 30, 2018

I wonder if those young trees could benefit significantly from a little herbaceous vegetation control.

Bill Astell
November 30, 2018

Introduced species can be good or bad.  You don't know til you try growing them.  Where I live Ontario Canada black locust is a wonderful tree to improve soil and provide valuable wood products but I understand that in some areas south of us it is considered a noxious weed.  Buckthorn was brought here from Europe as an ornamental shrub.  It has escaped broadly and is a noxious invasive plant here.  I have plenty of it on my 30 acre plot and although I hated it early on I came to almost appreciate it.  It was the only hardy bush/tree that could tolerate the nasty conditions on my land in the early days.  Without the buckthorn I would have had no shade as I planted better trees.  Also as I took them out I had excellent firewood.  Lately I've taken up spoon carving and no wood is as beautiful as buckthorn for that purpose.   Now the buckthorn is being shaded out and killed by all the quality trees I planted.  I can't quite say I'll miss the buckthorn but I have developed some appreciation for a species I thought had no redeeming features.

mrsgbee
December 1, 2018

Wonderful my only concern is they are planted so close together many will have to be lost.

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