Woodlands.co.uk Blog
Woods for sale for conservation and enjoyment

You are here: Home > Blog > Flora & Fauna > Unseasonal weather

Print this page

Unseasonal weather ~ by Lewis

Unseasonal weather

We have experienced an extended and warm autumn, and now true to Pliny's words -

"A fair and dry autumn brings in always a windy winter" - winter weather has now firmly settled upon us.  The temperature is down to "more representative" seasonal values for December, and cold, high winds have recently lashed Scotland and other parts of the U.K.

The warmest Autumn (for some 300 + years) was in 2006, when the temperature was some 2.4 / 3 oC above the seasonal average ; places like Kinlochewe recording a daytime temperature of 22.5 oC.   The recent mild weather * was due to an unusual pattern of high altitude winds over the Continent.  The course of the jet stream meant that there were southerly winds and relatively settled conditions over the United Kingdom.

The South and South East did not see a frost and the growing season for soft fruits was extended. Many flowers came into bloom again (poppies and hollyhocks in my garden).  As in 2006,trees stayed in leaf; and apple orchards recorded a bumper crop this year.  The profusion of berries, fruits and insects (including wasps !) has meant that many birds have remained active – blue tits were observed taking food to their young in their nests.

Lawn mowing was required throughout these months – as the grass continued to grow – a temperature below 7 oC is required for grass growth to come to a halt.

Whether the many juicy berries currently to be seen on the Holly trees are harbingers of really cold weather to come remains to be seen, or experienced !

Anyone interested in old sayings / adages / proverbs about the weather might be interested to have a look at "Weatherlore" (image of the cover is the featured image above) published back in 1893 - which is available at www.archive.org.

* to quote from the Met Office Site  “The mean temperature was 2.9 °C above the 1971–2000 average, resulting in provisionally the second warmest November in over 100 years - with only November 1994 warmer “

Posted in: Flora & Fauna ~ On: 13 December, 2011

Comments are closed for this post.

4 comments so far

R.B.H
9 April, 2012

weather lore, weather lore,
only true in days of yore,
wet autumn, dry spring,
it’s the 21st century-don’t mean a thing.

All the wonderful sayings are just nostalgia. death, taxes and unpredictable weather the only guarantees in life. met office, expensive computers from all over the world, they may be more accurate than weather lore but we all know a shift in wind and everything changes. We live on an island that is at the mercy of a maritime climate. The only saying I have heeded is – there’s no such thing as bad weather just the wrong clothes. My plot is green and bountiful, thanks to mother nature and her unpredictable weather.

Amanda
11 February, 2012

Mackerel skies and mares tails – wise sailors pull in their sails! This is very true!

Antony
2 February, 2012

That would be different from a mackerel sky ?
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Altocumulus_mackerel_sky

Vivien cruickshank.
2 February, 2012

I don’t think it possible to predict the weather way ahead. If the met office can’t do it, I don’t suppose anyone else can either. For predicting the weather within the next couple of days, I love the rhyme,
Mackeral sky, Mackeral sky,
Never long wet and never long dry. It seems to work out, much as the red sky at night does.

Leave a comment

© 2019 Woodland Investment Management Ltd | Disclaimer | Privacy Policy | Contact us | Blog powered by WordPress